Tag Archives: family life

Multi-Generational Life Together | United in the Body of the Christ

8 Feb

life

“and let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near” (Hebrews 10:24-25).

Monday evening Women’s Ministries hosted a Table Talk Event* focusing on Titus 2 as, “…a call for us to live differently, do relationships with others differently and speak and act differently because of God’s grace that saves us and instructs us to live in a new way” (Marcia Lichte). This multi-generational gathering focused on God’s transforming grace and the yearning to live in a way that is pleasing to Him and, “The realization that [our] daily relationship with God is based on the infinite merit of Christ instead of on [our] own performance…” (Jerry Bridges, Transforming Grace).

The Gospel provides the gravity (Christ’s blood) that pulls us to our knees at the cross where we can mercifully cling; grounded, changed. The unifying force of the Holy Spirit creates an accordance with the Lord that transcends and overrides any propensity towards divisiveness as we are drawn to other believers (Ephesians 4:3). Knowing God gives us a desire deep inside to love one another as Christ first loved us, sincerely and deeply from the heart (1 John 4:19, 1 Peter 1:22).  Christ’s presence binds us into an intergenerational body enabling accessible, familial relationships, mentorships, and friendships to grow.

Titus 2 outlines the mutual benefit and blessing derived from life together where we support, serve, encourage, and learn from each other bound by the mercy and grace of our Lord (Titus 3:5-7). It is through these examples that we reflect the light of Christ as “God’s people not good people” providing an opportunity for those who do not know Him to see the unique way our shared joy in His presence unites us in community (1 Peter 2:12) and reflects His glory (1 Corinthians 10:31). 

“Spirit filled, multi-generational unity is a powerful witness to God’s work in our churches” (Daniel Renstrom, Multi-Generational Worship). As foreigners and exiles living in the world let’s endeavor to present a genuine closeness that defies logic outside of the unifying work of the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 2:11-12, Titus 2:12)! 

*For those of you who were unable to attend the above mentioned event, click here for the evening’s Bible study: Titus 2 Study Handout.

Multi-Generational Worship by Daniel Renstrom

This is pure speculation, but it seems to me that when the modern worship movement came into town, churches became more and more age segregated.  There is probably a doctoral student somewhere in America working on this topic right now, so I’ll wait for that book to come out to tell me more about it.  But as a general observation, I do not remember churches in my youth having such radical age divides as they do now…

Continue reading here: Multi-Generational Worship – TGC Worship.

What Young Christians Can Learn From the Elderly | Life is Better in Community

The Reformation: Trick or Treat?

31 Oct

lutherOn this day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed the 95 Theses to the door of All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Looking back, Luther stated, “I would never have thought that such a storm would rise from Rome over one simple scrap of paper…”

The Reformation: Trick or Treat?

by David Mathis | October 31, 2013

It’s no accident that October 31 is both Halloween and the day remembered for the start of the Reformation. Both key off November 1, All Saints’ Day — or All Hallows’ Day Hallows from the Latin for saints or holy ones.On All Hallows’ Eve, October 31, 1517, the Roman Church received the world’s most memorable trick-or-treater at its door — though barely noticed at the time — when a lowly priest named Martin Luther approached the threshold of the Wittenberg branch in Germany and posted his 95 measly theses they aren’t nearly as impressive as you would expect. The coming All Saints’ Day seemed like an excuse for sparring about the Church’s deplorable sanctioning of indulgences, and Luther was angling for some good-spirited debate.

The Spark That Set the Church Ablaze

…Some nameless visionary translated his theses from the Church’s Latin into the people’s German and sent them far and wide through the printing press. In time, this lowly monk proved to have what it took to hold his ground against the Church and the world — “Here I stand,” he said courageously before the emperor — and under God, he became the human tip of the spear for massive reform…

Read the remainder of the article here: The Reformation: Trick or Treat? – Desiring God.

Links for Reformation Day:

 

What Young Christians Can Learn from the Elderly|Life Is Better In Community

18 Oct

life“Do not cast me away when I am old; do not forsake me when my strength is gone” –Psalm 71:9

Young people…the elderly are now what you will eventually become. The older generations possess a wealth of knowledge and wisdom most would love to share. Listen to their stories. The elderly know a lot about community and what it means to live life together. Many have enjoyed a long walk with Christ and would love to impart their experiences to the younger generations. Seek them out. Sit with them in worship. Hear their stories. Find out what their needs might be and serve them. In all these things there is much to be learned and an intergenerational community to be built.

What Young Christians Can Learn from the Elderly

Youth lends itself to the productive Christian life. We\’re active and healthy and have our whole lives in front of us. We are in control and independent. We need no help to make it through the day.

We are also really good at pretending the above is true.

Young people, myself included, want to appear independent. We are good at convincing others (and ourselves) that we are making do on our own. But the truth is that we\’re often lonely. In our efforts to remain independent, we have forgotten how to be dependent on a community.

The remaining article can be viewed here: What Young Christians Can Learn from the Elderly – The Gospel Coalition Blog.

Everything Family|For All Seasons of Life

5 Sep

Everything_FamilyStarting Sunday September 8 TACC will be focusing on all things related to family life. From dating to marriage, parenting to grandparenting, each season of life has its own unique challenges and benefits. Here at TACC we want to come along side one another as the family of God to help each other in the various stages of family life and seek biblical teaching to guide us.

Join TACC Sundays for 

10:30 AM Sermon Topics

  • 9/8 Manhood
  • 9/15 Womanhood
  • 9/22 Dating
  • 9/29 Marriage
  • 10/6 Parenting
  • 10/13 Singleness
  • 10/20 Divorce
  • 10/27 Homosexuality

6:00 PM Seminars*

  • 9/8 Tips for Parenting Preschoolers
  • 9/15 Honor and Respect
  • 9/22 Safe House: How to Respond to Emergency Situations in the Home
  • 9/29 Discipline
  • 10/6 Lying, Cheating, Biting, and Stealing
  • 10/13 Siblings
  • 10/20 Parenting Teenagers

*Childcare will be provided during all seminars

+Additional seminars will be held at Children’s House 9/10, 10/1, 10/8, and 10/22 for families unable to attend Sundays

For more information click here to access TACC website

 

Praying for my husband – from head to toe

15 Jun

father day2“Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.” Colossians 4:2

Tomorrow is Father’s Day, a day traditionally set aside to reflect on and celebrate fathers, husbands, uncles, sons, and grandpas. It is often a day when we who are wives go all out showering our spouse with gifts, affirmation, and affection. What if in addition we took the time to quietly and meaningfully lift them up everyday through prayer?

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness,” 2 Timothy 3:16

Dr. Don Whitney author of “Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life” suggests, “Pray through scripture and let it suggest, inform, and shape your prayer.” Praying scripture can help our minds to stay focused and encourage scripture meditation.

The following excerpt provides “head to toe” prayer framework with accompanying scripture:

I know marriage can be hard, and trusting someone to lead when there are things you struggle with together is really, really hard. But I also know God uses us in powerful ways to love our men like He does – unconditionally.

One of the best ways we can love our husbands is to pray for them.

Years ago I heard a concept about praying for our husbands – from head to toe.  So, today I wanted to share some verses and prayers that fit with that concept:

Head

“Father, I ask that You would continually renew my husband’s mind, resulting in a transformed life. Help him bring every thought into captivity to Christ to make it obedient to You. Give him a greater understanding of Your Word. Help him to think on things that are pure and right and worthy of praise.” (Psalm 119:15, Rom 12:2, 2 Cor.10:5)

Eyes

“Lord, keep opening my husband’s eyes to deep spiritual truths. Help him to see things as You see them. Please guard his eyes from looking at worthless things. ” (Psalm 119:18, Psalm 119:37)

Ears

“Father, let my husband hear Your voice clearly. Help him to recognize your voice with certainty. Protect him from listening to anyone who is not seeking and walking with You. Help him not to be affected negatively by what others say and to discern between good and evil. Give him the ability to determine what is of You and what is not.” (Is 30:21, 1 Kings 3:9, 1 John 4:1)

Mouth

“Help my husband to speak the truth in love. Help him to be quick to listen and slow to speak. Give him the couraage to lovingly confront when necessary. Let the words he speaks be Yours, not his own. Help him speak words that bring grace and truth to the hearers. I also pray that you will help him to grow in his ability and desire to communicate with you and others.” (Psalm 19:14, 119:13, 41:3; Eph 4:15, 4:29; James 1:19)

Heart

“Give my husband a heart that seeks passionately after You. Teach him to guard his heart with diligence. Help him deal with anything in his heart that is not pleasing to You. Create in him a pure heart. Enable him to lead our family with integrity.” (Psalm 78:72, 119:10-11; Prov 4:23; 1  3:13)

Hands

“Lord, I pray that everything my husband does would be done with his whole heart, serving You rather than man. I pray that You will also help him to increase his skills and his abilities. Bless everything he puts his hands to.” (Psalm 24:3-4, Col 3:23)

Feet

I pray my husband would love Your Words and walk in Your ways. I pray He would be to walk in a manner that is worthy of You, bearing fruit in every good work. Jesus show him how to creatively share your truth with our kids as he does life with them each day. Father, when he walks through the valley of the shadow of doubt and difficulties, I pray he would fear no evil because He knows that you are with him. (Deut 6:7, 8:6, Col 1:10, Psalm 23:4)

Let’s look for ways to build our husbands up – by giving them encouraging words and the gift of prayer – covering them from head to toe!

The article in its entirety can be viewed here: Praying for my husband – from head to toe.

 

Praying for My Husband | CBMW

21 May

woman-prayingDo you pray for your husband or about him? Do you ask God to make changes to him or effect an outcome that would really be for your benefit? Oftentimes we bring marital disagreements to God with the intent of changing our spouse when it is really ourselves that need our hearts adjusted.

“If I had cherished sin in my heart, the Lord would not have listened; but God has surely listened and has heard my prayer. Praise be to God, who has not rejected my prayer or withheld his love from me!” Psalm 66:18-20

Praying for My Husband

It was dinner time and I stood in the kitchen cutting up vegetables for a salad. Feeling bone weary, I prayed in my heart, “God, please bring my husband home from work on time tonight.” I stood in front of the sink to rinse off a cucumber and heard a loud crash coming from my boy’s room, followed by the sound of crying. Sighing, I turned off the water and headed for their room, still praying that my husband would hurry home. Not too long ago, I realized that most of my prayers for my husband centered on me and my needs. They stemmed more from my selfishness.  I prayed he would come home on time, prayed he would get the bonus we hoped for, and prayed he would watch the kids so I could sleep in. I even prayed that God would change all the things that frustrated me about him.

It was in reading Paul’s prayers to the churches in Ephesus, Colossians and Philippi where I learned the heart of prayer. Paul’s prayers centered on the spiritual growth of the people he was writing to.  For example, “I keep asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better. I pray also that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and his incomparably great power for us who believe” Ephesians 1:17-19. Paul essentially prayed through the gospel. He prayed for the power of the gospel to change and transform the believers he wrote to. While Paul certainly prayed for God’s provision and for other practical needs, the core and foundation of his prayers for others centered on their walk with Christ.

I want to pray for my husband the way Paul prayed for the New Testament churches. I want to pray for the gospel to be at work in my husband’s heart each day. I want to pray for the gospel to be the lens through which he views all of life. And I want him to be strengthened and empowered by the truths of gospel as he lives out God’s calling for him.Praying for the gospel to be at work in my husband’s heart and life is transforming, not only for him, but for me as well. I learn to let go of trying to change things about my husband and trust in God to do the changing He desires. Focusing on the gospel in my prayers changes the posture of my heart from relying on my strength to resting in the power of God’s grace. As I pray for the gospel to be at work in my husband’s heart, I am also reminded of how much I too need the gospel each and every day. It also reminds me that all of life is a gift of grace and that prayer is the entrance into receiving that grace.

The article in its entirety can be viewed here: Praying for My Husband | CBMW | The Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood.

Thankfulness is Something to Practice — Life As Mom

8 Nov

Thankfulness is Something to Practice

OCTOBER 30, 2011

When I was growing up, my mom would typically prompt Thanksgiving table conversation along the lines of, “Let’s go around the table and share something we’re each thankful for.”

Cringe. Shudder. Sticks out tongue. I hated that. (Sorry, Mom.)

Not only was I put on the spot, often “getting” to go first, but I felt embarrassed and awkward to voice aloud something that someone else might think was dumb or corny. Know-it-alls do not like to be perceived as dumb or corny. And I was most definitely a know-it-all.

Nowadays, I also realize that I just wasn’t a very thankful kid.

I always wanted something more. What we had certainly wasn’t as nice as what someone else had. I was the one crouching down in the backseat of the car when my mom stopped at garage sales or hiding in the racks at Kmart if I saw a kid from school.

Forget the fact that they were in Kmart, too! I perceived my parents’ frugality as a sign that we lacked something.

In reality, I didn’t know how good we had it.

Click here to read the rest of this post:   Thankfulness is Something to Practice — Life As Mom.

Hugs and Affirmation

20 Oct

From “Practical Theology for Women”  – Oct 10, 2011

Hugs and Affirmation

I am reminded daily of the interconnected nature of my parenting and my theology. Last week, I was at my wits end trying to figure out how to discipline my younger son, who is not normally the challenging child in our family. He was having a hard week, acting out angrily and then throwing out emotionally charged language at me when disciplined – “I hate you.” “You don’t want to be my mommy.” “You don’t love me.” And even more disturbing – “I don’t like myself.” “I don’t want to be in this world.”

What in the world?! Where was he getting that stuff? The acting out was escalating, along with the emotional verbal aftermath. I brought this burden with me into our mom’s group Bible study last week. As we shared our burdens for our children, one mom told how she had been intentionally affirming and hugging her problem child multiple times a day and the difference that was making in her child’s attitude. I thought, could it really be that simple?! But I felt burdened afterwards that I should do the same with my son.

I knew that giving him extra hugs and affirmation at random times of the day wouldn’t change how I handled his outbursts. I wasn’t going to hug and affirm him if he hit his brother. But I was hoping that if I hugged him and affirmed him when he was behaving, then when the time came to discipline him when he sinned, he would receive it from me without going into his You-hate-me-and-I-hate-myself routine.

Click here to read the rest of this article: �Practical Theology for Women: Hugs and Affirmation.

The Superwoman complex » CBMW

16 Oct

The Superwoman complex

Diane Montgomery

October 7, 2011

Superwoman complex: A woman’s wish to be excellent at all her roles (leader, professional, mother, wife etc.), that very often leads to psychological stress and feeling guilty toward family members or an expectation of being a superwoman that can and should do everything.

I have to confess: if you look this term up in the dictionary, you’ll find my picture right next to it. Guilty as charged. I never realized I fit into this category until just a few weeks ago. I was a little over one month into marriage, taking summer school, making home-cooked meals 3-4 times a week, working out 4-6 times a week, packing my husband’s lunches and mine, working almost 40 hours a week, involved in church ministry, cleaning house, writing papers, reading 200 pages a day for my class, trying to be a friend, daughter, and the perfect wife. I was exhausted by all of this and I don’t even have kids yet! After working 10 hours for my job one Saturday afternoon in a dirty, sandy outdoor concert, I came home and broke down.

Have you ever seen that episode of Saved by the Bell, when Jessie Spano was trying to balance all her life activities and then becomes addicted to caffeine pills to try and succeed at everything? My life was similar to that, minus the drug addiction. At the end of the episode Jessie finally freaks out. She goes from trying to prove she can sing on drugs, to yelling, to finally incoherently balling/mumbling, “No time, there’s never any time!” I think the writers of this show must have looked forward into the future, seen my breakdown and said, “This is great material! Let’s add some pills and we’ll have a great show!” Unfortunately for my husband though, he had to play theencouraging and consoling part of Zach.

Click to read the rest of the article:  CBMW » The Superwoman complex.

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