Unfailing Compassions > Kyria Blog

1 Dec

Unfailing Compassions

The truth behind God’s compassions and offering my own

by LaTonya Taylor

A couple months ago my friend Rosalyn asked me to sing soprano on a recording of her jazz-inflected arrangement of the 1923 hymn “Great Is Thy Faithfulness.”

As I sang the first verse of the hymn—the verse that includes the phrase, “Thou changest not/ Thy compassions they fail not”—I found myself emphasizing the word compassions. Even though I sang the other portions of the verse slightly differently each time I recorded, one thing was always the same: I’d sung the word compassions more expansively than in the traditional rendering of the hymn.

A few weeks later I still find myself humming Rosalyn’s arrangement and thinking about the idea of compassions.

I know that the line I sang comes from the prophet Jeremiah’s reflection on why his people could trust God, even after the fall of Jerusalem: because God is unfailingly, renewably compassionate. I know too that as a child of God, I am to be compassionate.

Yet my understanding of that term has been fairly limited. I’ve only thought of “compassion” as singular, and with humanitarian connotations: it implies a willingness to respond to poverty or calamity with resources. A secondary meaning would be akin to deep sympathy.

As I think more about what it means be conformed to Christ’s image, I’m facing an ugly reality: My compassions fail frequently, and have hard limitations.

Click here to read the rest of the article: Kyria Blog: Unfailing Compassions.

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